Tagged "Side Dish"


Quinoa Ahi Tuna Poke Bowl with Spicy Baklouti-Miso Dressing

Posted by Rachel Dougherty on

 

Ahi Tuna Marinade
2 tablespoons soy sauce (Tamari if possible)
1 teaspoon Serrano Honey Vinegar
1 teaspoon Japanese Roasted Sesame oil
1 teaspoon black sesame seeds, plus more for garnish
1 pound sushi-grade ahi tuna or sushi-grade wild salmon, 1" cubes
2-3 scallions, thinly sliced

Salad
6 cups organic mixed spring greens
1 medium English cucumber cut into 1'" dice
1 large avocado

Spicy Baklouti Miso Dressing
1 rounded tablespoon yellow miso
2 tablespoons honey ginger white balsamic
2 tablespoon Baklouti Olive Oil

1 tablespoon Garlic Olive Oil
1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
2 tablespoons plain yogurt

For serving
4 cups cooked quinoa cooled to room temperature
Pickled ginger, optional
4 small squares of roasted dried seaweed snacks (nori) cut up for garnish, optional

DIRECTIONS
 
Prepare 4 cups cooked quinoa set aside and allow to fully cool to room temperature.
 
Prepare the tuna marinade by placing all marinade ingredients into a medium bowl and whisking. Add cut up tuna and toss to coat. Refrigerate tuna while preparing the rest of the recipe or up to 20 minutes.
 
Make the Miso Dressing by adding all dressing ingredients to the bowl of a blender or food processor. Process on high until the mixture is fully blended and creamy. Set aside. 
 
Just before serving, in a large bowl toss 6 cups of mixed greens with 4-6 tablespoons of miso dressing. Compose the bowl by adding 1 cup of cooked quinoa to the bottom of each bowl. Add a mound of dressed mixed greens to the top of the quinoa. Divide the cut up avocado and cucumber to each salad. Place equal portions of the tuna on top of the greens. Place cut up nori strips atop salads and serve immediately.
 
Serves 4 as a light meal or 6 as a small salad   
Read more →

Easy Olive Oil Roasted Garlic

Posted by Rachel Dougherty on

 

This recipe is extra simple and extra delicious.  Slow roasting whole garlic heads brings out a nutty sweetness in the garlic and turns the cloves creamy and spreadable.  A robust olive oil is a must here otherwise you will loose the lovely marriage of flavors as the character of olive oils with modest phenol content will dissipate under such heat.

The ways in which you can then use this "garlic candy" as I call it, are endless. You can use them in dressings, sauces, marinades, smeared on a slice of toasted baguette with a drizzle of olive oil and a pinch of sea salt, in aioli, on roasted meats, grilled meats, fish, chicken breast, with vegetables, on baked potatoes, in pasta, and on, and on...

Roasted Garlic with Robust Olive Oil
7-9 firm, whole heads of garlic, with the stem end sliced off.  (Do not slice the root end or the bulb may fall apart)
1/3 cup Fresh, Robust, extra virgin olive oil

Preheat the oven to 400.  In a pie tin, cake pan, or other shallow oven proof baking vessel, place the garlic heads cut side up. Drizzle each head generously with approximately two teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil.

Seal the pan tight with aluminum foil and bake for 35-40 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant, soft, and golden brown.

Read more →

Slow Cooker White Beans with Rosemary

Posted by Rachel Dougherty on

 

The beans above are exceedingly delicious, simple, and comforting.  They remind me of bygone days spent in my Italian grandmother's kitchen, and the sense of comfort I had when she would set a brimming bowl of  pasta fagioli, in front of me. Eating her simple, nutritious, and downright scrumptious food always brought a smile to my face.  I hope this recipe does the same for you.


 Rachel's Pasta Fagioli With Olio Nuovo - Hold The Pasta
1 pound Great White Northern Beans, rinsed and picked over
1 medium celery rib, coarsely chopped
2 large shallots, diced 
1 large carrot, peeled and coarsely chopped
1/4 pound smoked bacon diced 
2 large cloves of garlic, coarsely chopped
5 quarts chicken broth or stock, vegetable stock, or cold water
1 - 2" sprig fresh rosemary
1 dried bay leaf


Directions
Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste (at least 1 tablespoon recommended if not using stock)
1/2 cup Robust Olive Oil


Combine all the ingredients except for the olive oil in a large slow cooker.  Set the cooker to high for 6 hours.  Once the beans are tender, taste and adjust seasoning. Drain the beans with a slotted spoon and serve slathered in Olio Nuovo with crusty bread.
Read more →

Honey-Serrano Vinegar Pickled Beets

Posted by Rachel Dougherty on

 

This is an easy recipe and it draws its unique, and addictive flavor from marrying the inherent earthiness of beets with the spicy-sweet tang of hand crafted honey-serrano vinegar.

That being said, you could substitute the honey-serrano vinegar with many other options including champagne, white balsamic, Sicilian Lemon balsamic or honey-ginger white balsamic.  Experiment and see what you like best.  Below, please find my recipe for Honey-Serrano Pickled Beets.

Ingredients
2 lbs. small to medium sized beets, scrubbed, washed, and trimmed
1 tablespoon high polyphenol extra virgin olive oil
Approximately 2 cups honey-serrano vinegar

Directions
Preheat the oven to 375.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.  Wash and scrub the beets thoroughly.  Place the whole beets on to the baking sheet and enclose the beets with another sheet of foil.  Roast the beets for approximately an hour, depending on size.  If using large beets, it may take up to 2 hours for the beets to roast.  Check to see if they're done by piercing the beet with a paring knife.  If it slides in to the center of the beet with little resistance, the beets are done.

Allow the beets to cool and then slip off the skins.  You can also use a paring knife to help peel them.  Cut the beets in to 1" wedges, circles, or crinkle cut.  Place the beets in to a glass jar with a lid and cover with 2 cups of honey-serrano vinegar or enough vinegar to just cover.  Refrigerate the beets for 24 hours, and enjoy.
Read more →

Arancini fried in olive oil

Posted by Rachel Dougherty on

 

They say you can't fry with extra virgin olive oil. "They" say "it's unhealthy" and that it burns creating toxic byproducts.  Some folks say, for instance, that "one should only use extra virgin olive oil for finishing and cold applications, and use cheaper, refined olive oil or other types of vegetable oils to fry and cook with."  You've heard this mantra repeated by chefs, perhaps prominent public figures and even Food Network celebrities.  You might've even heard this from dieticians and those who seem like a good source of information on the topic of culinary applications with extra virgin olive oil.  Well, guess what?  "They" are wrong, sort of.

What's more than likely, is that "they" are using poor quality, old, and/or adulterated extra virgin olive oil.  If the FFA of an olive oil is over .5, will it smoke at lower temperatures?  Heck yes!  If it's old, oxidized, and devoid of good phenolic content, will it stave off the formation of toxic aldehydes that typically form in other types of cooking oils when heated?  Nope, at least not as effectively!  So the key is knowing the crush date and chemistry of the extra virgin olive oil you are using.

Most TV celebrity chefs would go blank if asked to define FFA, oleic acid, or phenols and the role they play in the stability and health benefit of extra virgin olive oil.  Most doctors and dieticians are well behind the curve on their practical knowledge of the chemical parameters of extra virgin olive oil, and which ones are particularly important when we look at nutrients, stability, and how they affect suitability for various culinary applications.

*Disclaimer:  In the making of the deep fried risotto croquette above, no Up Extra Virgin Olive Oil was made to smoke, nor were toxic aldehydes formed

Truffled Wild Mushroom Risotto & Arancini in Baby Arugula UP Pesto

Porcini/Shitake Mushroom Stock
5 cups water brought to a simmer
2 cups of a mixture of dried Porcini mushrooms and Shitake mushrooms broken in to pieces or coarsely chopped

Bring the water just up to a simmer and then add the mushrooms.  Allow to steep for 30 minutes before using in recipes.  Strain before using.

Make the risotto:

5 cups mushroom stock

3 tablespoons UP Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 shallots, finely chopped
sea salt and freshly ground pepper 
1 1/2 cups Arborio or Carnaroli rice  
1/2 cup white wine
1 teaspoon white or black truffle oil  
1 pound mixed wild mushrooms, thinly sliced
1/2 cup freshly grated Pecorino cheese  
2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
In a medium saucepan, bring the stock to a simmer. Keep warm. In a large saucepan, heat the olive oil and add the mushrooms.  Season with salt and pepper and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes.   Add the shallots and saute for another few minutes until the mushrooms are nicely caramelized and the shallots are cooked through and translucent.
Add the rice and cook, stirring until well coated with olive oil and beginning to toast. Add the wine and cook, stirring until the wine is absorbed. Add 1 cup of the warm stock and cook over moderate heat, stirring constantly, until nearly absorbed. Continue adding the stock 1/2 cup at a time, stirring constantly, until it is nearly absorbed between additions. The risotto is done when it is opaque and just the sauce that has formed from the rice, creamy.  About 20 minutes total. Add the truffle oil and cheese in at the very end, and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. 
Eat this now using any leftovers for the recipe below.

The Arancini 
3 cups cooled, leftover risotto from the recipe above or your own
1 1/2 cups plain bread crumbs
1 large egg, beaten
6 oz. mozzarella fresca (fresh mozzarella in water) 
UP Extra Virgin Olive Oil for deep frying I recommend Oro Bailen or Melgarejo's new oils for this 
Mix together 1/2 cup of bread crumbs and the beaten egg with the cooled risotto.  Heat 2" of UP Extra Virgin Olive Oil to 350 F. in a heavy pot with relatively high sides.  Preheat the oven to 250 F.  
Place the breadcrumbs in a shallow dish or plate for rolling the arancini and cut the mozzarella into small 1/2" cubes.
Using a scoop or spoon, portion out 2 tablespoons of risotto mixture and roll into a ball.  Gently push one piece of mozzarella into the center of each ball and re-roll between your hands to encase the cheese.  Roll the ball in the bread crumbs to fully coat and deep fry until golden brown.  Place the fried hot ball of arancini on a rack and hold in the oven while frying the rest.  Serve hot with the cheese melting in the center.   

Baby Arugula Pesto
3 cups baby arugula washed and dried
1/2 cup UP Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 teaspoons fresh squeezed lemon juice  
1/2 cup grated Pecorino cheese
1 large clove garlic chopped
Sea salt to taste

Add all of the ingredients to the the container of a a blender or food processor.  Pulse to combine and adjust seasoning with salt if desired.  Serve with the arancini above or with bread, pasta, vegetables.... you name it.
Read more →